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A financial writer and adviser recently penning a family law-linked article for Forbes notes the notion of “forever” that is so inextricably tied to betrothals for young married couples.

And then Rob Clarfeld duly spotlights “that close to half of all marriages in the United States end in divorce.”

That disconnect is notable and enduring, and it frequently comes to the fore in any discussion focused upon prenuptial agreements.

Clarfeld stresses that he does have a romantic side strongly supporting couples’ hopes of lasting bliss. That is tempered, though, by his professional experience as a wealth manager. His long tenure as an adviser has taught him that marital contracts should be objectively viewed and approached with an open mind by young couples in love.

Yes, that can be hard to do, Clarfeld notes, but legions of couples materially benefit from doing a bit of due diligence concerning prenuptial agreements. Discussing a prenup and its broad-based applicability concerning financial affairs is instantly educational, and having a proven family law attorney carefully craft one can benefit marrying couples regardless of whether their union endures or ultimately fails.

Clarfeld spotlights a prenuptial contract’s utility in several areas. He stresses that it “may provide the ultimate protection against the inadvertent conversion of separate property into marital property.” A prenup can also help ensure that intended beneficiaries receive envisioned inheritances, which can be a matter of pronounced importance for marrying children from wealthy families.

Generally, too, merely discussing a marital contract can promote financial candor between a couple and encourage them to openly communicate regarding matters they might otherwise ignore or deflect.

That communication, notes Clarfeld, “may be essential.”